How to recognize modern, truly American makes and models of cars | Taza Khabre

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  • The definition of “made in America” ​​for cars has changed over the years as many American brands source important components from Asian countries.
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration requires automakers to disclose the origin of vehicle parts and assemblies, but it’s difficult to determine the exact percentage of American content in a vehicle.
  • Despite the change in definition, American-made cars still have advantages such as unique designs and potentially lower prices due to minimal shipping costs.


You feel proud when you buy goods (or services) produced in your country. Thus, it is not surprising that most US citizens gravitate to the dealerships of American automakers such as

Chevrolet
and

Ford
purchase domestic high-class equipment.

However, what constitutes American cars has changed dramatically over the years. Most of these cars from brands headquartered in the United States have critical components manufactured in Asian countries before being shipped to the U.S. for final assembly. Thus, the American-made tag gradually became somewhat redundant.

But this does not mean that there is a lack of American cars. There are certain factors that need to be taken into account in order to unearth full-fledged American cars. And if you want to make the process a lot easier, consider the brands that not only started life as American companies, but also automakers from other continents that have made the US their fishing ground. This article takes a deep dive into the American-made cars and top brands (along with their nameplates) that fit this description.

This article was created using data from NHTSA and Consumer Reports.


Made in America: A mantra that has lost its relevance?

Unsplash | Laura Rivera

As stated earlier, the phrase “made in America” ​​doesn’t carry the same weight as it used to. For context, Dodge, Jeep and Chrysler became integrated under the wing of Italian automaker Fiat after declaring bankruptcy back in 2009.. But does this mean that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), along with the cars it makes, are American? The answer is somewhat unclear. Additionally, there is debate that most nameplates made by companies such as Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Tesla, Lincoln, Dodge, Ford, Chrysler, RAM, and Jeep are not produced within the United States of America. . And surprisingly enough, foreign car manufacturers like Mercedes-Benz and Honda have factories in the United States that produce cars. All of these facts point to the question — which cars live up to the Made in America mantra?

RELATED: 10 Classic American Dream Cars That Are Still Cheap

From the federal government

The US flag on the background of the Empire State Building
Washington News

According to the guidelines of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), all car manufacturers have to keep track of where car parts come from, their final assembly points, the jurisdictions where the engine and transmission were manufactured, and the countries from which all the individual components installed on the vehicle originate. Before the vehicle leaves the production lines, the relevant manufacturer must insert a sticker detailing these data bits.

But it does not end! As can be seen on North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) document, these decals must show the percentage of North American (specifically the United States and Canada) additions included in the vehicle, without showing the exact amount those jurisdictions contribute to the total. However, it’s worth noting that parts from Mexico and other jurisdictions are listed separately, which means it’s almost impossible to give an accurate estimate of which parts of the car are all-American.

All-American Showdown: 23 cars matching the American brand

Limited Edition 2023 Bronco Heritage in Yellowstone Metallic
Ford

For a car to qualify as “Made in America” ​​(from our POV), at least 50 percent of its parts must be sourced from North America. As such, you’ll notice that several nameplates are not exclusively American cars, such as the stalwart and beloved Ford Bronco (18 percent North American content), the Ford Expedition (25 percent North American content), the Cadillac Escalade (37 percent North American content), and the simply breathtaking Lincoln Navigator (23 percent North American content) doesn’t make our list. Please note that these values ​​are accurate and have been filtered from NHTSA reports on the American Automobile Labeling Act (AALA). (edition of 2023).

Without further ado, let’s take a look at nameplates from reputable automotive brands that meet the American-made threshold with at least 50 percent of the applicable parts sourced from the North American AALA countries of the United States and Canada. Please note that this list only features 2023 model year cars. Notable mentions include:

2023 Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang Mach 1
Ford Motor Company

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

60%

the United States

2023 Toyota Grand Highlander

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

60%

the United States

2023 Toyota Corolla

Toyota Corolla 2023 Sedan
Toyota

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

55%

the United States

2023 Toyota Tundra

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

55%

the United States

2023 Toyota Camry

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

70%

the United States

2023 Toyota Sequoia Hybrid

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

2023 Honda Accord

2023 Honda Accord
Honda

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

65%

the United States

2023 Acura Integra

The front quarter of the 2023 Acura Integra
Via: Acura

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

60%

the United States

2023 Acura MDX AWD

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

65%

the United States

2023 GMC Savana

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

54%

the United States

2023 GMC Canyon

A white 2023 GMC Canyon AT4 parked in the open
GMC

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

51%

the United States

2023 Hyundai Santa Cruz

2023 Hyundai Santa Cruz Black Front Quarter
Hyundai

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

55%

the United States

2023 Chevy Colorado

Main image of the 2023 Chevy Colorado Trail Boss
through Chevrolet

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

51%

the United States

2023 Kia Sportage

2023 Sportage X-Pro
Kia

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

55%

the United States

2023 Kia Telluride

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

60%

the United States

2023 Nissan Altima

white 2023 Nissan Altima in the driveway
Nissan

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

2023 Nissan Pathfinder

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

2023 Nissan Murano

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

55%

the United States

2023 Subaru Legacy

White Subaru Legacy 2023 on the road
Through Subaru

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

2023 Subaru Outback

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

2023 Lexus TX 350

Lexus TX front quarter
Via: Lexus

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

65%

the United States

2023 Lexus ES 250/350

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

2023 Lexus TX 500h

USA/Canada (percent content)

Country of final assembly

50%

the United States

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American-made cars: what are the advantages to note?

A yellow 2023 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 parked in the open
Chevrolet

While “made in America” ​​may have a slightly distorted meaning than what it meant a few decades ago, Americans still show nationalism by buying cars (mostly) from their jurisdiction. Despite the endorsement, are there other good reasons why US citizens use American-made cars? The answer is definitely yes. why For these two main reasons:

Aesthetics

When it comes to automotive aesthetics, American-made cars have unique design features that are sure to turn heads on all fronts. General Motors, Ford, and Chevrolet are just a few of the American automakers that raise the bar every year, delivering nameplates with stellar aesthetics that in turn translate into great sales.

BY TIM: 10 most beautiful cars of all time

Price

One of the main reasons Americans buy cars made in their jurisdiction is price. With shipping costs at their lowest, automakers can offer affordable MSRPs for their latest models. However, it’s worth noting that this commitment is sometimes overshadowed by greedy dealers known for marking up cars thousands of dollars more than the manufacturer originally intended.

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